Friday, June 22, 2007

Update: AFI’s 100 Years...100 Movies - 10th Anniversary Edition

After searching the web, I found that the list compiled by the AFI of the 100 Greatest American Films that I posted on Thursday was the original one from 1998. As many of you know, the AFI recently came out with an updated 10th Anniversary edition of the list. Please accept my apologies for the oversight.

As it did in 1998, Orson Welles masterpiece "Citizen Kane" once again came in at numero uno. You won't get any arguments from me with that choice. The fact that this was Welles' film debut makes it all the more amazing!

After comparing the 1998 and 2007 lists, there were a few things that stood out to me:

Spike Lee's in-your-face classic about race relations in America, "Do the Right Thing" debuted on the new list at #96. Although "Driving Miss Daisy" one the Best Picture Oscar the year that "Do the Right Thing" was released, which one would you rather watch today? In case you were wondering, "Driving Miss Daisy" did NOT make the list. Radio Raheem like a mofo!

One of Scorsese's many films to get dissed at the Oscars (The Raging Bull) jumped 20 spots to #4. Arguably the greatest boxing film ever made! Also, the black and white cinematography is magnificent!

"The African Queen" took a dive, falling from #17 to #65! Anyone who knows me well can tell you that Humphrey Bogart is my favorite actor... hands down. However, I wouldn't even put "The African Queen" in my Bogie Top 10. Although it has some good moments (Bogie's drunken rant directed at Hepburn's "crazy, psalm singing skinny old maid", Hepburn dumping Bogie's hooch into the river the morning after, etc.), it doesn't do all that much for me.

The Buster Keaton silent film "The General" was the highest ranking film that was new to the updated list, coming in at #18! Sad to say that I am sorely lacking in my silent film knowledge. Since TCM shows silent movies on a regular basis, I need to do a better job of checking these out.

Otto Preminger's 1944 classic "Laura" still didn't make the list. Since I deleted my previous post about the 100 Greatest Films, I wanted to include the comments left by The Gal Herself (she writes the blog One Gal's Musings) in regards to "Laura":

"It's one of the most beautiful black and white films ever made. And as a love story, it's romantic yet surprisingly dark at the same time. The cop falls for a dead chick's painting, Waldo loves obsessively, Laura's fiance is really no more than a gigolo ... Pretty intense stuff for the day, but handled in such a sophisticated manner."

I am in complete agreement with "The Gal Herself" concerning her take on "Laura". Below are a few of the other films that I think should have made the cut:

The original version of "All the King's Men"- A great political drama that features some dynamite performances, none better than Broderick Crawford's powerhouse Oscar-winning portrayal of Willie Stark. His transformation from the hick wannabe politician to ruthless, womanizing power broker is amazing!

"Stalag 17"- a precursor to "M*A*S*H", in that it combined comedic elements with the harsh realities of war.

"Airplane!"- Surely, you won't tell me that this shouldn't have been on the list?

For a look at the list, please check out the following link:

http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/19351746/

What films do you think should have/shouldn't have been included?

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

In looking over the top 100 films. I was happy to the addition of "Whose Afraid of Virginia Wolfe" at number 67 and Shawshank Redemption at number 72. One of favorite movies of all times is at number 25 "To Kill A Mockingbird". Gregory Peck's performance is subtle, yet compelling and of course there is ole "Boo Radley" (Robert Duvall's first big screen role). A bit of trivia from the film: The woman who portrayed the maid Calpurnia was none other than Esther Rolle's (of "Good Times" fame) older sister.
pjazzypar

Anonymous said...

In looking over the top 100 films. I was happy to the addition of "Whose Afraid of Virginia Wolfe" at number 67 and Shawshank Redemption at number 72. One of favorite movies of all times is at number 25 "To Kill A Mockingbird". Gregory Peck's performance is subtle, yet compelling and of course there is ole "Boo Radley" (Robert Duvall's first big screen role). A bit of trivia from the film: The woman who portrayed the maid Calpurnia (Estelle Evans) was none other than Esther Rolle's (of "Good Times" fame) older sister.

I agree that leaving "All The King's Men" off of the list is a travesty. Mercedes McCambridge was superb is the oscar winning supporting role as Willie Stark's downtrodden chick on the side.

I was glad to see that Spike Lee is receiving some credit for his contributions to the industry with "Do The Right Thing". "You scared of the ovens? Hit the ovens!". All kidding aside I cannot really argue with the choices on the list because it is a matter of personal taste.
pjazzypar

Malcolm said...

Wow, I didn't know that "Calpurnia" was Esther Rolle's older sister! I love picking up new tidbits like that!

As for the 100 movies chosen, nothing jumped out at me in a "How the hell could that had made the list?!" sort of way.

Good call on Mercedes McCambridge's role as "Sadie" in All the King's Men.

Sadie to Willie: You're not used to alot of things are you Willie?

Jack: Why don't you lay off 'em Sadie?

Sadie: Are you Willie? Are you! Are you! Are you! Are you! Are you!!

The Gal Herself said...

Hey! You quoted me! Thanks. And because of our "conversation," I went out and rented Laura. My favorite line of dialog belongs to Waldo: "I hope you'll never regret what promises to be a disgustingly earthy relationship." It's a dark, gorgeous, sophisticated movie.

 
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